Guest Artist: Ready for the Next One

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Tiny Home by Gini

Isn’t this sweet? This small quilt was made by Gini in my Tiny Homes class in Madison, WI a while back. Here’s what she says:

Just wanted to let you know that had a wonderful time at your Tiny House workshop in Madison and an even better time with all the embroidery.  Your fabrics and thread make it an absolute joy – they make me so happy!  I have a tendency to overthink and your approach was very freeing and spontaneous.  And I haven’t messed up my iron either! …..I’m ready to start another project using the same technique.

Thanks for sharing your work with us Gini. I am so happy you did not mess up your iron!

Going to Grand Rapids?

Young Forest #5 by Laura Wasilowski

Young Forest #5 by Laura Wasilowski

This summer, three of SAQA’s art quilt exhibits can be found in Grand Rapid, MI. Both Seasonal Palette and Food for Thought will be on display at the newly renovated Gerald R. Ford Museum from July 1 through August 31st. The exhibit, People & Portraits will be on view as part of AQS Quilt Week in Grand Rapids from August 10-13.

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Young Forest #5 (detail) by Laura Wasilowski

Sadly, this is your last chance to see Seasonal Palette. But happily my quilt, Young Forest #5, is part of this exhibit. I’m told this is one of SAQA’s most popular exhibitions having been viewed by over 100,000 people around the globe. 

Graphic Imagery Class Success!

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Flowers by Janice made in Creating Graphic Imagery Class

Last week I taught a workshop at Quilter’s Affair in Sister OR called Creating Graphic Imagery. And the results were magnificent! Here you see a the beginnings of a beautiful quilt by one of my students, Janice.

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Creating Graphic Imagery is a revival of a “woodcut” class I taught long ago. Students receive a color pallet of fabrics in pastel and bright rainbow gradations. The kit fabric is fused as is a piece of black background fabric.

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Fused fabric shapes are cut and placed on top of the black to reveal a small black outline around each shape. This gives it the “woodcut” look that makes its so dramatic. Each quilt design was different in class because each student designed their own work and made a pattern for themselves. That’s what I call a successful class.

Balance: Making Flowers on Silk #10

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Another set of jolly flowers to the right of the giant flower help balance out this free-stitched garden. It only takes two circles of the Lazy Daisy Stitch to make the daisy-like blooms. But first, the centers are made with a circle of Stem Stitches that are filled in with Needle Weaving. Add a few French Knots and these posies are complete.

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More flowers drop in across the silk repeating shapes and colors. And the grasses are filled in with Straight Stitches and the loops of the single Lazy Daisy Stitch.

Just like making a balanced design, life requires balance too. And that’s why I’m setting this project aside for a while as I begin a week of dyeing. It’s also an opportunity to think about where to stitch next on this small garden on silk.

Are You a Botanist? Making Flowers on Silk #9

silkflowers22Isn’t that yellow thread gorgeous on the blue silk? The 5 petals of these flowers are made with a Fly Stitch. It’s similar to the Lazy Daisy Stitch but with a wide opening at the base. By placing the Fly Stitches in a circle, you make a star shape flower. Stitch a bundle of French Knots in the center and add botanist to your resume.  Sweet!

silkflowers23You may want to start filling in the background with more grass. (I’m using a Size 12 in the Nasturtium colorway that repeats the color in some of the flowers.) Try inventing a few more small flowers above the grasses. I know you can do it!

The Lazy Daisy Stitch using a Size 12 in the Peas in a Pod colorway replicates leaves in the background A finer thread like the Size 12 easily fills in spaces making a mound of vegetation.