It Takes This Long to Make It

windycity6

Windy City #6 (9″ x 12″) by Laura Wasilowski

A few days ago I asked if you could estimate how many hours it took me to make this small quilt, Windy City #6. And, as an experiment, I tried to keep track of the time to complete it. But honestly, my skills at time keeping stink! It seems I go into a zone when making a quilt and lose track of time.

Below are the stages of creating the art work and an estimate of the number of hours to complete each stage. Let’s see how close you were in guessing the total time.

  • Hand-dyeing the fabrics-  .5 hours
  • Fusing the fabrics-  .5 hours
  • Designing the quilt-  1 hour
  • Adding hand embroidery-  6.5 hours
  • Machine quilting and binding-  1 hour
  • Photographing and documenting the quilt-  .5 hours
windycity6detaila

Windy City #6 (detail) by Laura Wasilowski

The total is about 10 hours from start to finish with most of time spent on hand embroidery. Now, what you don’t see in this list is the hours of enjoyment I got from making the art work. That’s really hard to measure.

How Long Did It Take to Make?

What’s the most frequently asked question you receive when you show your art work? I bet its “How long did it take you to make it?” We’ve all heard this many times. My cheeky response has always been “A life time.”

windycity6

Windy City #6 by Laura Wasilowski

But not any more. I decided to actually keep track of my time when making Windy City #6. It measures about 9″ x 12″, is made with fused fabric scraps, hand embroidered, and machine quilted. Can you guess the total time it took to create this quilt from design to the final stitch? Give me a few answers and I’ll let you know in a few days.

Thread-u-cation Thursday: A Spiky Chain

spikychain7Lately I’ve been exploring a variation on the Chain Stitch that I’d like to share with you. It’s sort of a chain with a little bite to it; a combination of the Chain Stitch and Blanket Stitch.

spikychain6It probably has a name (and please let me know if it does) but I’m calling it the Spiky Chain. It starts out with the straight line of a Chain Stitch then veers off the path and then returns to the path. Here are the directions for the Spiky Chain. Happy Thread-u-cation Day!

Thread-u-cation Thursday: Herringbone

herringbone3Welcome to Thread-u-cation Thursday! Our featured embroidery stitch today is the Herringbone Stitch. I must admit that I seldom use this stitch. (Sorry for my lack of enthusiasm but the good old Herringbone Stitch is rather ignored in my embroidery life.)

herringbone4Unless I’m trying to spice up a straight piece of fabric like the green tree trunk above. Then I’m all about the Herringbone. What better way to add zip to a skinny piece of fabric? (Please note that tree trunk is a design detail from my new pattern, The Nut House.)

herringbone2And then there is the ability of the Herringbone Stitch to stretch out or compress to make shapes like this forest of trees on the lake shore. (You have to use your imagination.) OK, maybe the good old Herringbone Stitch deserves another look. Here are the directions. Please let me know how you use the Herringbone Stitch.