Accidental Design?

Your next quilt composition can begin with a simple design trigger like this bias-fused collage of light blue and purple fabric. It has so many possibilities! Creating artwork from design triggers is common practice if you are an improviser. I call this method of making art accidental design.

Being an accidental artist is the topic for my current online class with Quilter’s Affair. Students create design triggers after building several fused collages. Then they use their scraps and collages to develop compositions based on those design prompts. Here’s what became of my design trigger. In keeping with my quest for the perfect vase, I created this striped vase for skinny flowers placed on an orange doily.

Tiny Homes Make Me Happy!

Tiny Homes #3 by Laura Wasilowski

This quilt is an example made for my online class at Quilter’s Affair called Tiny Homes. I demonstrated how to construct the quilt top in the class but not how to add the hand embroidery. That came later after all the filming was “in the can” as they say.

Tiny Home #3 (detail) by Laura Wasilowski

An advantage of my teaching an online class is that I spend less time lugging luggage and racing through airports. That means I have more time to stitch quilts like Tiny Homes #3. So I’m enjoying my summer of relaxation by adding hand embroidery to quilts and free-form embroidery designs. I hope you’re enjoying a relaxing day too!

Teaching Myself a Lesson

Housing Department #29 by Laura Wasilowski

Housing Department #29 was made for an online class I’m teaching at Quilter’s Affair this week. The filming for the class took place months ago and I’m now reviewing the final videos that the students will see.

And in seeing the videos again, I’ve taught myself a lesson. What have I learned?

  • I have learned that I give my students a lot more information in an online class than if I present the course in person.
  • Students get a close-up view of the construction process. They don’t have to squint from the back row of the classroom to see the examples.
  • They can rewind and see a lesson over and over again rather than hear directions once and be expected to execute a step.
  • They can work at their own pace and not feel rushed by their neighbors’ progress or the clock on the wall.
  • Students have access to their own tools and work in their own space.
  • I can show multiple examples of how to make a design describing the construction in more detail.
  • And I can show the entire process of adding hand embroidery to a design rather than just giving a quick description of stitching a fused quilt at the end of class.

I’m really happy that I made these online classes for my Quilter’s Affair students. It’s a good feeling knowing that I’ve given my all in preparing for the classes.