Wool Winner Announced

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Free-Form embroidery on wool by Sarah.

Thank you all for leaving comments for the wool scraps give-away. It’s always fun to hear about you’re creative plans. We all have such active imaginations that must be nourished with art making! And speaking of creativity, isn’t this embroidery by one of my students beautiful? Thank you Sarah for sharing your artwork with us.

joyfulstitchingfrontcoverI must admit, I owe my love of wool stitchery to my new book, Joyful Stitching. Writing the book taught me so much about the joy of free-form embroidery. (You can read a recent review of the book here.)

And now for the lucky winner of the package of wool scraps. I’ll be sending it out to: Jackie of Colorado.

Thank you all and keep on stitching!

Hands Across the Water

handoffortunesusanIt’s such a delight to see how people are using my book, Joyful Stitching. Here’s a great example of the Hand of Fortune project made by Susan. Susan is from the Big Island, Pele, in Hawaii. She writes, “Your book is fun. I’m a life long embroiderer, make lots of Hawaiian crafts, feather lei, lauhala weaving, other things too.”

Susan finds needlework very “grounding”. And I couldn’t agree more! Her interpretation of the project warms my heart. It makes me so happy to see embroidery work from around the world whether from big or small islands.

Thanks Susan for sharing your work with us!

A Great Idea!

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Pam of Ithaca and her artwork.

I get the best ideas from my creative students. Meet Pam, who attended my class in Ithaca, NY in April. To my delight she walked into the classroom with this gorgeous embroidery of her hand. She says her hand-embroidery on silk was inspired by the Hand of Fortune project from Joyful Stitching.

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A tracing of my grandson’s hand, age 3.5.

 

And then she gave me a gift.

Pam suggested tracing those tiny hands of our children, grandchildren, nieces, and nephews and stitching them too. What a great way to commemorate the growth of a child!

Thank you Pam for sharing your artwork and your stupendous idea.

A Book Review for You

needlenthreadI’ve long been an admirer of Mary Corbet. Her hand embroidery is so lovely and her friendly style of explaining her techniques keeps me reading her blog, Needle ‘n Thread, on a daily basis.

joyfulstitchingmaterialsAnd today I want to thank Mary for her kind review of my new book, Joyful Stitching: Transform Fabric with Improvisational Embroidery.

You can see her review here: Joyful Stitching Book Review  Thank you Mary for your inspiration and encouragement!

A Favorite Combination

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Rare Songbird (detail) by Laura Wasilowski

And now for a final (and favorite) stitch combination. The Fern Stitch lends itself to many stitch combinations that you’ll find my new book, Joyful Stitching. It evokes the shape of leaves, climbing vines, or even a bird’s tail feathers.

In the Rare Songbird project, three vertical lines of Fern Stitches are outlined in Stem Stitches using the same orange thread. French Knots, in a light blue thread, fill in the spaces between to make a decorative tail for the bird.

I hope the examples of stitch combinations we’ve reviewed in the last few weeks will come in handy and add to your own free-form stitchery arsenal.

May your combinations always rock!

The Famous and Bold French Knot

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Dyed in the Wool #1 by Laura Wasilowski

You may have heard that a chapter in my new book, Joyful Stitching, went missing. For those of us who are fond of mystery novels, I’m pretty sure it was kidnapped. (Still awaiting ransom note.) The missing chapter called Combinations Rock! covered how combining two or more embroidery stitches added texture, pattern, and shapes to fabric. 

And talk about texture! The French Knot is famous for its bulky texture. But combine it with the Bullion Knot, and your thread leaps off the fabric. In Dyed in the Wool #1, the stitch combination of French and Bullion Knots give the sheep a curly fleece you just want to pet.