How to Outline Sunshine

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Windy City #5 (detail) by Laura Wasilowski

Outlining the shapes with hand embroidery on this little quilt added so much to the liveliness of the design. Here are a few other ways to outline the shapes in your next fused art quilt.

windycity5detaildAdd a Blanket Stitch to trim out shapes like this turquoise batik fabric above. Whip stitch another color of thread through the base of the Blanket Stitch to get a rope-like look. The Back Stitch gives a nice dashed line around shapes like the Size 8 Oranges pearl cotton thread on the green batik fabric.

windycity5detaileAnother way to neatly finish an edge like the sun in the Windy City #5 design is with the Spiky Chain Stitch. It’s sort of a combination of the Chain and Blanket Stitches. Here you see it in orange around the circle. The Fly Stitch adds sharp points to the sun and French Knots add punctuation marks to the points.

(See Windy City #5 and other small art works for sale at the Artfabrik booth #1314 at the International Quilt Festival in Houston this week.)

How to Outline an Outhouse

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Windy City #5  by Laura Wasilowski

It’s been a lot of fun adding hand embroidery to outline shapes on this little quilt, Windy City #5. You can see it in person at the Artfabrik booth #1314 at the International Quilt Festival in Houston this week. Here are few of the stitch details for those of you who can’t attend the show.

windycity5detailbThe roof of the house is outlined with two sets of Blanket Stitches, one an “innie” and one an “outie”. The blue Blanket Stitches tipped with green French Knots are made with a Size 8 Aquamarine pearl cotton thread. Along the side of the house is the trusty Blanket Stitch as well as the Back Stitch in that same Aquamarine thread.

windycity5detailcThe Chain Stitch outlines the roof of the er…um… outhouse and the tree. Adding the simple Running Stitch next to the tree shape helps repeat that same Aquamarine color used elsewhere. And the pinked fabric edge of the field is finished with the Fly Stitch. French Knots fill in the divots.

There’s more to come! I’ll share it with you soon.

Thread-u-cation Thursday: A Spiky Chain

spikychain7Lately I’ve been exploring a variation on the Chain Stitch that I’d like to share with you. It’s sort of a chain with a little bite to it; a combination of the Chain Stitch and Blanket Stitch.

spikychain6It probably has a name (and please let me know if it does) but I’m calling it the Spiky Chain. It starts out with the straight line of a Chain Stitch then veers off the path and then returns to the path. Here are the directions for the Spiky Chain. Happy Thread-u-cation Day!

Thread-u-cation Thursday: Herringbone

herringbone3Welcome to Thread-u-cation Thursday! Our featured embroidery stitch today is the Herringbone Stitch. I must admit that I seldom use this stitch. (Sorry for my lack of enthusiasm but the good old Herringbone Stitch is rather ignored in my embroidery life.)

herringbone4Unless I’m trying to spice up a straight piece of fabric like the green tree trunk above. Then I’m all about the Herringbone. What better way to add zip to a skinny piece of fabric? (Please note that tree trunk is a design detail from my new pattern, The Nut House.)

herringbone2And then there is the ability of the Herringbone Stitch to stretch out or compress to make shapes like this forest of trees on the lake shore. (You have to use your imagination.) OK, maybe the good old Herringbone Stitch deserves another look. Here are the directions. Please let me know how you use the Herringbone Stitch.