Interior Landscapes?

prettyplanetpalmtreesWe’ve reached that time in my gardening life where I shut myself up in the house. Why, you ask? Because mosquitoes roam the earth looking for blood, my blood.

prettyplanetpalmtrees1So what’s a gardener to do? Why work on a landscape indoors, of course! Here you see a quilt sample from my defunct Pretty Planets class being turned into a small piece of art. All it lacks is some machine quilting and a few tiny dots representing…. mosquitoes.

Transformation of Old to New

littlelandscapestitch1

Little Landscape (pre-stitched)

It’s not often you get a chance to transform something old into something new. But like a magician, I shall soon turn this old quilt (2005) into a snappy updated version. And all through the magic of hand embroidery.

littlelandscapestitch2Can you see it changing right before your eyes? Good, cause it’s taken me several hours and several TV shows to get it to this point. This is a small piece (9″ x 9″) so I’m using fine, size 12 threads on the rather small elements that make up the design.

Improv Stitching on Wool #3

sheep1In keeping with the theme that I’ve lost touch with reality, my embroidered sheep acquires green fleece. French Knots and Bullion Knots (Size 8 Lime Frappe pearl cotton thread) placed closely together resemble the curl of sheep’s wool, don’t you think? These stitches also have the advantage of lifting off the surface of the fabric evoking the cushy texture of a woolly sheep.

sheep2This is what I love about free form embroidery. Like a good mystery novel, you discover as you stitch. Each stitch gives you a clue as to what the next stitch should be. And as you progress through the embroidery, you become more confident of how it will end.

Stay tuned for more fascinating sheep stories soon.

Improv Stitching on Wool #2

woolimprov1I’m a picture person. An odd shape of fabric or random doodle on paper always conjures up an picture or image in my mind. These few random stitches on wool above suggested an image to me. Can you guess what it is?

woolimprov2I think its a sheep. Now, I don’t know much about sheep or goats or any of those animals with curly horns. But when you improvised a stitched image, who cares? I’ve extended the original couched thread shape to form the animal’s body. Now that I have an outline, I can fill it in and hope to becomes a creature of some sort.

Put a Bird on It Again!

lilliputgarden2This quilt from 2012 is a demonstration of how to create a basic quilting block (the 9-patch) with fused fabrics. Rather boring.

lilliputgarden2detail3Hand embroidery placed in the center of each square, makes sweet little flower gardens. Still rather boring.

lilliputgarden2withbirdsSo recently I put birds on it. A solution for all your not so interesting quilts!

Save

Save

A Tiny Birdhouse Part 2

commission67The shape of the small birdhouse is now on the fabric through the miracle of Pattern Transfer to a Fused Fabric! Using a really sharp pair of Karen Kay Buckley scissors, small areas are snipped to reveal openings for the birdhouse.

commission68It’s a tiny birdhouse for very tiny birds.

commission69After trimming, a white batik fabric is slipped under the birdhouse shape. This fills in the openings. Should I make black dots for the holes into the birdhouse? No! Why, you ask? Because it looks like a bunch of eyeballs staring out at me from the birdhouse.

commission76Three more birdhouses are created and fused to the quilt top. This commission quilt (detail of center panel above) is coming along but there is a lot of machine work to do. Hope to show you more on that later.

Save

Save

Save