Is Bigger Better?

Notebook kept for Season Palette quilt.

Monday, when I was talking with Pat Sloan on American Patchwork and Quilting Radio, she asked if my quilt style had changed recently.  In thinking it over I noted that fewer large quilts (over 20″ x 20″) are being made in the studio. Small, hand embroidered work is the main focus.

Hand-dyed fabric olors chosen for the Seasonal Palette quilt.

But there is one large quilt in the works for me that has been on the design wall for months. It’s for the SAQA Seasonal Palette juried exhibit opening at the International Quilt Festival in Houston this fall. This giant of a quilt measures about  32″ w x 78″ h. That’s big for me!

Pre-fused scrap fabrics chosen for the Season Palette quilt too. Do not store your fused fabrics like this!

One of the requirements after acceptance in this exhibit is to document the process of creating the work including inspiration, design, techniques, etc. Here are few images of the beginnings of this quilt. The season I was given is Spring. Yipee!

If your fused fabrics do get wrinkled, iron them flat on a Teflon sheet.

Let’s hope I get it done in time. Wish me luck!

Is Bigger Better?

Notebook kept for Season Palette quilt.

Monday, when I was talking with Pat Sloan on American Patchwork and Quilting Radio, she asked if my quilt style had changed recently.  In thinking it over I noted that fewer large quilts (over 20″ x 20″) are being made in the studio. Small, hand embroidered work is the main focus.

Hand-dyed fabric olors chosen for the Seasonal Palette quilt.

But there is one large quilt in the works for me that has been on the design wall for months. It’s for the SAQA Seasonal Palette juried exhibit opening at the International Quilt Festival in Houston this fall. This giant of a quilt measures about  32″ w x 78″ h. That’s big for me!

Pre-fused scrap fabrics chosen for the Season Palette quilt too. Do not store your fused fabrics like this!

One of the requirements after acceptance in this exhibit is to document the process of creating the work including inspiration, design, techniques, etc. Here are few images of the beginnings of this quilt. The season I was given is Spring. Yipee!

If your fused fabrics do get wrinkled, iron them flat on a Teflon sheet.

Let’s hope I get it done in time. Wish me luck!

How to Tuesdays: Stitching in a Car

Hand embroidery completed while driving. Well, I’m not driving. But someone is.

Next time you take a long car ride, bring your stitching project along. I do this all the time. Above you see some of the stitching completed during a really really long ride to the east coast. (Click here to see the step-by-step process for constructing the quilt.)

Here are some helpful tops for stitching on your next road trip:

  • Safety first. Have someone else drive the car.
  • Only stitch in the daylight. Unless you are wearing a head lamp, stitching at night can be dangerous.
  • Bring all your supplies with you (needles, thread, scissors, thimble). Most roadside convenience stores do not carry embroidery thread.
  • Find a safe place to stick the needle when it’s not being used. I can not stress this enough. You may think you are just popping out of the car for a quick coffee run but you are really losing the needle in the seat of the car only to be discovered by a disgruntled spouse when it’s your turn to drive.
  • Expect attention from passing semi-truck drivers. Truck drivers are very nosy and like to look over your shoulder when you stitch.
  • Do not listen to politics on the car radio. Reactions to stupid remarks by candidates can cause you to lose control of the needle resulting in finger stabs.
  • Do not give driving directions when stitching. The driver does not appreciate seeing a needle waving “go left” out of the corner of his eye.
Betty’s Bloomers #24 pre-stitchery

I hope you have found these suggestions helpful. And remember, no matter where you go, there you are.

Laura

How to Tuesdays: Stitching in a Car

Hand embroidery completed while driving. Well, I’m not driving. But someone is.

Next time you take a long car ride, bring your stitching project along. I do this all the time. Above you see some of the stitching completed during a really really long ride to the east coast. (Click here to see the step-by-step process for constructing the quilt.)

Here are some helpful tops for stitching on your next road trip:

  • Safety first. Have someone else drive the car.
  • Only stitch in the daylight. Unless you are wearing a head lamp, stitching at night can be dangerous.
  • Bring all your supplies with you (needles, thread, scissors, thimble). Most roadside convenience stores do not carry embroidery thread.
  • Find a safe place to stick the needle when it’s not being used. I can not stress this enough. You may think you are just popping out of the car for a quick coffee run but you are really losing the needle in the seat of the car only to be discovered by a disgruntled spouse when it’s your turn to drive.
  • Expect attention from passing semi-truck drivers. Truck drivers are very nosy and like to look over your shoulder when you stitch.
  • Do not listen to politics on the car radio. Reactions to stupid remarks by candidates can cause you to lose control of the needle resulting in finger stabs.
  • Do not give driving directions when stitching. The driver does not appreciate seeing a needle waving “go left” out of the corner of his eye.
Betty’s Bloomers #24 pre-stitchery

I hope you have found these suggestions helpful. And remember, no matter where you go, there you are.

Laura

Why I’m a Little Nervous about Today

Curious George and I are a little nervous.

To my dismay I have a bad habit. My bad habit is that I rely upon my memory rather than a calendar or list.

Here’s an example: I glance at my return flight information and memorize the departure time. Days later I am confident that my flight leaves at 10:30 AM. My flight leaves at 9:10 AM. I miss the flight.

This bad habit of trusting my memory has got to stop! If it doesn’t stop soon I shall become way too familiar with the Dallas/Fort Worth airport. A familiarity I can do without.

That’s why I’m a little nervous about today. Today I have an appointment for an interview with Pat Sloan on American Patchwork & Quilting radio. The live interview begins at 4:00 PM EST. I live in central time so that means 3:00 PM, right? Sure hope I can keep this straight.

If you tune today at this web address you’ll see if I made it. Or if Pat is on the air alone.Wish me luck!

Why I’m a Little Nervous about Today

Curious George and I are a little nervous.

To my dismay I have a bad habit. My bad habit is that I rely upon my memory rather than a calendar or list.

Here’s an example: I glance at my return flight information and memorize the departure time. Days later I am confident that my flight leaves at 10:30 AM. My flight leaves at 9:10 AM. I miss the flight.

This bad habit of trusting my memory has got to stop! If it doesn’t stop soon I shall become way too familiar with the Dallas/Fort Worth airport. A familiarity I can do without.

That’s why I’m a little nervous about today. Today I have an appointment for an interview with Pat Sloan on American Patchwork & Quilting radio. The live interview begins at 4:00 PM EST. I live in central time so that means 3:00 PM, right? Sure hope I can keep this straight.

If you tune today at this web address you’ll see if I made it. Or if Pat is on the air alone.Wish me luck!