A Little Known Fact about Fabrics for Fusing

It’s a little know fact (I love that phrase!) that when you pick out fabrics for your next fused art quilt you want to look at the back of the fabric. You are making a raw edge or fused quilt which means you don’t necessarily finish the edges of design elements with stitching. You see the edge of the fabric.

 If you have a great print on one side, the other side may be almost white. When you cut out an element from that fabric, a white edge will appear around the element. Use hand dyed or batik fabrics. The color goes all the way through the fabric. It’s a little known fact!

A Little Known Fact about Fabrics for Fusing

It’s a little know fact (I love that phrase!) that when you pick out fabrics for your next fused art quilt you want to look at the back of the fabric. You are making a raw edge or fused quilt which means you don’t necessarily finish the edges of design elements with stitching. You see the edge of the fabric.

 If you have a great print on one side, the other side may be almost white. When you cut out an element from that fabric, a white edge will appear around the element. Use hand dyed or batik fabrics. The color goes all the way through the fabric. It’s a little known fact!

Seduced by an IPad Cover

Digital sketch made with the Art Studio app on the IPad

Like many of you I’ve been seduced and charmed by the IPad. It houses my favorite app, Art Studio, and let’s me surf at the touch of a finger tip. So why not give it a sweet place to live?

Seedpods #2 was printed in repeat using Spoonflower’s custom fabric printing service.

Hence a new IPad cover made using a sweet template and instructions from Clover and Nancy Zieman of Nancy’s Notions. The outside cover fabric is an image of my quilt, Seedpods #2 (above), that I had printed in repeat using the Spoonflower  custom fabric printing service. Inside is a green batik fabric.

For someone who can not read or follow directions without changing course, this was a very easy project. The well written directions for E-Tablet and Paper Tablet Keepers have great illustrations to match. (Watch a helpful Youtube video that Nancy’s made on how the tablets are made.) The construction of the IPad cover goes quickly and you can easily alter the design if you like.

Which I did.

Here are the changes I made:
First I painted the elastic for the corners to hold down the IPad. My reason? We had a snow storm and I could not go to the store to get the black elastic and I kinda like this blue-green version anyway!

A stylus keeper was necessary too to hold my handy-dandy BoxWave stylus in place using another painted strip of elastic. I just stitched it to the top of the inside cover.

Instead of using elastic on the base of the cover, I chose to make little triangles to hold hold the Ipad in place.

A fused binding with decorative machine stitches was really fast to do.

My favorite innovation in the design? Adding a small pocket to the inside to hold papers. (I used the flap template for this.)

This is Frieda Anderson’s version of the paper keeper. Just beautiful!

There are several other versions of how to make an Ipad cover or tablet keeper (like Frieda’s above) available on Nancy’s blog. You’ll be amazed at what people did. After you visit her blog link, you want to leave a comment on her blog. The generous people at Clover have provided 3 prizes for a February 1 giveaway!

Seduced by an IPad Cover

Digital sketch made with the Art Studio app on the IPad

Like many of you I’ve been seduced and charmed by the IPad. It houses my favorite app, Art Studio, and let’s me surf at the touch of a finger tip. So why not give it a sweet place to live?

Seedpods #2 was printed in repeat using Spoonflower’s custom fabric printing service.

Hence a new IPad cover made using a sweet template and instructions from Clover and Nancy Zieman of Nancy’s Notions. The outside cover fabric is an image of my quilt, Seedpods #2 (above), that I had printed in repeat using the Spoonflower  custom fabric printing service. Inside is a green batik fabric.

For someone who can not read or follow directions without changing course, this was a very easy project. The well written directions for E-Tablet and Paper Tablet Keepers have great illustrations to match. (Watch a helpful Youtube video that Nancy’s made on how the tablets are made.) The construction of the IPad cover goes quickly and you can easily alter the design if you like.

Which I did.

Here are the changes I made:
First I painted the elastic for the corners to hold down the IPad. My reason? We had a snow storm and I could not go to the store to get the black elastic and I kinda like this blue-green version anyway!

A stylus keeper was necessary too to hold my handy-dandy BoxWave stylus in place using another painted strip of elastic. I just stitched it to the top of the inside cover.

Instead of using elastic on the base of the cover, I chose to make little triangles to hold hold the Ipad in place.

A fused binding with decorative machine stitches was really fast to do.

My favorite innovation in the design? Adding a small pocket to the inside to hold papers. (I used the flap template for this.)

This is Frieda Anderson’s version of the paper keeper. Just beautiful!

There are several other versions of how to make an Ipad cover or tablet keeper (like Frieda’s above) available on Nancy’s blog. You’ll be amazed at what people did. After you visit her blog link, you want to leave a comment on her blog. The generous people at Clover have provided 3 prizes for a February 1 giveaway!