Want to See Some Tiling with Nancy Z?

So I’m drifting through the Internet the other day (in my zombie like surfing mode) when what do I come across? It’s a YouTube video of Nancy Zieman and me talking about Tiling.

Tiling is a method of overlapping fused symmetric fabric shapes onto each other in a tile like fashion. You can build textured and patterned collages in this way with square, circle, or even leaf shapes like these above. (The leaves are cut with an AccuQuilt fabric cutter and die.)

The video is not only educational but I’m wearing my favorite shirt. Sadly the shirt has passed on to shirt heaven. I miss that shirt.

Want to See Some Tiling with Nancy Z?

So I’m drifting through the Internet the other day (in my zombie like surfing mode) when what do I come across? It’s a YouTube video of Nancy Zieman and me talking about Tiling.

Tiling is a method of overlapping fused symmetric fabric shapes onto each other in a tile like fashion. You can build textured and patterned collages in this way with square, circle, or even leaf shapes like these above. (The leaves are cut with an AccuQuilt fabric cutter and die.)

The video is not only educational but I’m wearing my favorite shirt. Sadly the shirt has passed on to shirt heaven. I miss that shirt.

Can You Cut This Fabric?

One of the phrases heard most often in my classroom is, “I can’t cut into this hand-dyed fabric. It’s too precious!”

Please, don’t worry. We’re always making more. Why deny yourself the pleasure of working with beautiful fabric?

But, alas, I am a hypocrite. There is a stack of hand-dyed fabric in my studio that is never on the market, is never touched and is never cut. It is too precious!

But today I did it! I pulled out my precious stack of fabric and sliced off sections for a new quilt. It was scary but it also energized me. Cutting the fabric released me from a cloth prison of my own making. It gave me the freedom to create something new with beautiful fabric.

Are you a fabric hoarder? Are you a prisoner of the cloth? Maybe it’s time to give yourself permission to use your best and favorite fabric. They’ll always make more!

Can You Cut This Fabric?

One of the phrases heard most often in my classroom is, “I can’t cut into this hand-dyed fabric. It’s too precious!”

Please, don’t worry. We’re always making more. Why deny yourself the pleasure of working with beautiful fabric?

But, alas, I am a hypocrite. There is a stack of hand-dyed fabric in my studio that is never on the market, is never touched and is never cut. It is too precious!

But today I did it! I pulled out my precious stack of fabric and sliced off sections for a new quilt. It was scary but it also energized me. Cutting the fabric released me from a cloth prison of my own making. It gave me the freedom to create something new with beautiful fabric.

Are you a fabric hoarder? Are you a prisoner of the cloth? Maybe it’s time to give yourself permission to use your best and favorite fabric. They’ll always make more!

Stitch-a-thon Day 4: A Fit of Decorative Bliss

As we bring our Stitch-a-thon Marathon to an end, our attention turns to the tablecloth. Stitching the edges of the tablecloth with a Blanket Stitch gives it a nice finish like the decorative edge on a real tablecloth. (And I’m about reality here.) The Tangerine colorway in the Size 8 thread lets me repeat the colors used in the leaves.

And speaking of repetition, the Degas Blue size 12 thread is used in a row of Cross Stitches across the tablecloth dots. Lends a rather festive air, don’t you think? 

And as long as we are feeling festive, add French Knots to the dots. These dots on dots plus dots around the edge of the composition really decorate the piece nicely.

And here is the final quilt. With a little machine quilting around the edge it will be complete and ready for display.  Thanks for joining be in my Stitch-a-thon! We’ll have more to see in the new year!

Stitch-a-thon Day 4: A Fit of Decorative Bliss

As we bring our Stitch-a-thon Marathon to an end, our attention turns to the tablecloth. Stitching the edges of the tablecloth with a Blanket Stitch gives it a nice finish like the decorative edge on a real tablecloth. (And I’m about reality here.) The Tangerine colorway in the Size 8 thread lets me repeat the colors used in the leaves.

And speaking of repetition, the Degas Blue size 12 thread is used in a row of Cross Stitches across the tablecloth dots. Lends a rather festive air, don’t you think? 

And as long as we are feeling festive, add French Knots to the dots. These dots on dots plus dots around the edge of the composition really decorate the piece nicely.

And here is the final quilt. With a little machine quilting around the edge it will be complete and ready for display.  Thanks for joining be in my Stitch-a-thon! We’ll have more to see in the new year!