My Secret About This New Magazine

Speaking of magazines, have you seen this new magazine called IQ International Quilts? The premiere issue was released at the recent International Quilt Festival in Houston. It is packed full of photos and articles on quilt makers from around the world.

The exquisite cover quilt is by Yoko Sekita from Japan. Inside is a gallery of her work and that of Sally Scott (South Africa), and Parisian artists, Edyth Raymond and Gabriel Paquet. The tour of international quilting continues with colorful images from Australia, the UK, and the Hoffman facility in Bali.(Great photos!)

Quiet Morning designed on an IPad

Included in this premiere issue is my article: Design Your Next Quilt with an IPad. It shows you how to use your IPad as a digital sketchbook and how to convert your drawings into fabric. I must confess. I’ve only done this once and it was for this article. Don’t tell anyone!

Quiet Morning sketch used as the pattern.

Deb Roberts is the editor of the new magazine, travel host, and she’s been all over the map. The quilting reports from each corner of the globe prove that this love of fabric and stitching is an international obsession!

My Secret About This New Magazine

Speaking of magazines, have you seen this new magazine called IQ International Quilts? The premiere issue was released at the recent International Quilt Festival in Houston. It is packed full of photos and articles on quilt makers from around the world.

The exquisite cover quilt is by Yoko Sekita from Japan. Inside is a gallery of her work and that of Sally Scott (South Africa), and Parisian artists, Edyth Raymond and Gabriel Paquet. The tour of international quilting continues with colorful images from Australia, the UK, and the Hoffman facility in Bali.(Great photos!)

Quiet Morning designed on an IPad

Included in this premiere issue is my article: Design Your Next Quilt with an IPad. It shows you how to use your IPad as a digital sketchbook and how to convert your drawings into fabric. I must confess. I’ve only done this once and it was for this article. Don’t tell anyone!

Quiet Morning sketch used as the pattern.

Deb Roberts is the editor of the new magazine, travel host, and she’s been all over the map. The quilting reports from each corner of the globe prove that this love of fabric and stitching is an international obsession!

Why I’m Positive about the Negative

Have you seen the new American Quilter Magazine (January 2012 edition)? Next time you take a break from you crazy holiday shopping schedule, please check out Page 50.  My article, The Positive of the Negative, shows you how I went about making this simple little quilt above.

This quilt idea was a rare stroke of genius (sort of like a dim light bulb coming on).  Why not use a leaf die from Accuquilt to make both the positive leaf shapes and the negative leaf shapes for quilt designs?

Sprouts #2

It’s such a thrill to discover the many uses of negative shapes like those in the border around Sprouts #2.  Using both the positive and negative cuts from a die cutter is now my favorite use of die cut fabrics!

I know I didn’t invent it but, let’s all pretend I did.

Why I’m Positive about the Negative

Have you seen the new American Quilter Magazine (January 2012 edition)? Next time you take a break from you crazy holiday shopping schedule, please check out Page 50.  My article, The Positive of the Negative, shows you how I went about making this simple little quilt above.

This quilt idea was a rare stroke of genius (sort of like a dim light bulb coming on).  Why not use a leaf die from Accuquilt to make both the positive leaf shapes and the negative leaf shapes for quilt designs?

Sprouts #2

It’s such a thrill to discover the many uses of negative shapes like those in the border around Sprouts #2.  Using both the positive and negative cuts from a die cutter is now my favorite use of die cut fabrics!

I know I didn’t invent it but, let’s all pretend I did.

How to Make an Improvised Art Quilt Day 8: Inner Stuff

The quilt composition improvised from my fused fabric scraps is complete and it’s time for the fun part, adding fine details with hand stitchery! But first…..

It’s not glamorous but someone has to do it. We have to make the inner stuff, the batting and Timtex that give you something to stitch into and that will hold the quilt into shape. We’ll do this with a Wrapped Binding. (You can find more precise directions here, Wrapped Binding Directions.) The first step in making a Wrapped Binding is to  measure the quilt top. Stack the Timtex and batting (scrim side to Timtex) and cut them about 1 1/2″ smaller on each edge than the quilt top. Then cut off and additional 1/2 around each edge in a wavy manner.

After the batting and Timtex are cut the same size and shape, open them up and mark at a corner where they match up. This is very important! Do this for your sanity.

Now center the batting onto the back side of the quilt. The background fabric is about 1″ larger than the batting on each edge. Remember this batik background fabric has fusible web all over it. (Set the Timtex aside. After all the hand embroidery is done through the batting layer, then you’ll put the Timtex behind the batting.)

So be careful! Flip the quilt top and batting over and slip release paper underneath. The release paper is there to keep you from fusing the quilt top to the ironing surface.

Using a dry pressing cloth, steam set the quilt top to the batting for 10 seconds in each spot. Glide the iron, don’t place it or you will have iron shapes all over your quilt. (Ask me how I know.)

Now that we’ve steam set the glue the fun part begins! Hand stitchery!

How to Make an Improvised Art Quilt Day 8: Inner Stuff

The quilt composition improvised from my fused fabric scraps is complete and it’s time for the fun part, adding fine details with hand stitchery! But first…..

It’s not glamorous but someone has to do it. We have to make the inner stuff, the batting and Timtex that give you something to stitch into and that will hold the quilt into shape. We’ll do this with a Wrapped Binding. (You can find more precise directions here, Wrapped Binding Directions.) The first step in making a Wrapped Binding is to  measure the quilt top. Stack the Timtex and batting (scrim side to Timtex) and cut them about 1 1/2″ smaller on each edge than the quilt top. Then cut off and additional 1/2 around each edge in a wavy manner.

After the batting and Timtex are cut the same size and shape, open them up and mark at a corner where they match up. This is very important! Do this for your sanity.

Now center the batting onto the back side of the quilt. The background fabric is about 1″ larger than the batting on each edge. Remember this batik background fabric has fusible web all over it. (Set the Timtex aside. After all the hand embroidery is done through the batting layer, then you’ll put the Timtex behind the batting.)

So be careful! Flip the quilt top and batting over and slip release paper underneath. The release paper is there to keep you from fusing the quilt top to the ironing surface.

Using a dry pressing cloth, steam set the quilt top to the batting for 10 seconds in each spot. Glide the iron, don’t place it or you will have iron shapes all over your quilt. (Ask me how I know.)

Now that we’ve steam set the glue the fun part begins! Hand stitchery!