When Your Friend Falls Apart

My dear friend had to go in for repair today. Alas, the best sewing machine I have ever had, a Janome 7000, seized up and could not stitch another stitch. It may have something to do with the fact that I seldom clean it and have not had it serviced in ….er…..ever.

Is that wrong? Am I supposed to have it serviced once a year or something? It worked like a charm for years and we were such good pals! My newer machine stepped in to help out but I’ve always like the older one better. Is that wrong?

When Your Friend Falls Apart

My dear friend had to go in for repair today. Alas, the best sewing machine I have ever had, a Janome 7000, seized up and could not stitch another stitch. It may have something to do with the fact that I seldom clean it and have not had it serviced in ….er…..ever.

Is that wrong? Am I supposed to have it serviced once a year or something? It worked like a charm for years and we were such good pals! My newer machine stepped in to help out but I’ve always like the older one better. Is that wrong?

Are Your Cockles Warm Yet?

It was a cold day in February when Frieda and I traveled to Madison, WI to film 2 episodes of Sewing with Nancy. But our lovely hostess, Nancy Zieman, soon has us thawed out and ready to shoot. Well, Frieda was thawed. I was just ready to shoot.

Our new DVD with Nancy is called Art Quilts- Fusible Collage Workshop. And there is a companion book to go with it called….. Art Quilts- Fusible Collage Workshop. Here you see the cover of both. Frieda’s is the little barn quilt on the cover and mine is the basket of flowers.

The DVD and book really are like taking workshops with us (without the singing). We give you lots of good tips and projects that will gladden your heart and warm your cockles if they need warming.

Here’s Frieda rehearsing with Nancy on the set. (I am thawing my cockles off stage.) You can find the book and DVD this September at the Quilt Expo in Madison where we are also teaching and vending, and doing the famous Frieda and Laura show called, Two Hot Fuser Chicks. Please come see us!

Are Your Cockles Warm Yet?

It was a cold day in February when Frieda and I traveled to Madison, WI to film 2 episodes of Sewing with Nancy. But our lovely hostess, Nancy Zieman, soon has us thawed out and ready to shoot. Well, Frieda was thawed. I was just ready to shoot.

Our new DVD with Nancy is called Art Quilts- Fusible Collage Workshop. And there is a companion book to go with it called….. Art Quilts- Fusible Collage Workshop. Here you see the cover of both. Frieda’s is the little barn quilt on the cover and mine is the basket of flowers.

The DVD and book really are like taking workshops with us (without the singing). We give you lots of good tips and projects that will gladden your heart and warm your cockles if they need warming.

Here’s Frieda rehearsing with Nancy on the set. (I am thawing my cockles off stage.) You can find the book and DVD this September at the Quilt Expo in Madison where we are also teaching and vending, and doing the famous Frieda and Laura show called, Two Hot Fuser Chicks. Please come see us!

Being a Do-er Ain’t Bad: Day 5

Another free form sculpture created through the miracle of junk drawer hardware!

The jewelry class with Thomas Mann taught me more than how to saw and rivet metal. It also gave me a new perspective on how I work as an artist.

When I make art quilts I’m not mindful of how I create. I just make the stuff. Free cut at piece of fabric, fuse it into place. But when working in a different material like metal, suddenly I am very aware of how I go about designing and making the art.

This is what I learned from taking this jewelry class:

  • It’s hard to work in a classroom situation. With so many people bustling around it’s difficult to concentrate. You can either ignore everyone else or engage fellow students and learn from them.
  • Have the right tools for the job. Without the right tools for the materials you are working with, you can’t even begin to make the art work. Without saws, hammers, drills, and the handy anvil, you can’t work in metal.
  • One piece of art work can lead to the next and the next. Left over shapes can inspire the next creation.
  • Everyone learns a new skill differently. Some students need written directions, or visual directions, or verbal directions or are tactile learners. 

It became obvious to me that I am a tactile learner and need to work with the materials directly. The fancy name for this is a “kinesthetic”. The not so fancy name is a “do-er”. Are you a do-er or one of those other people?

Being a Do-er Ain’t Bad: Day 5

Another free form sculpture created through the miracle of junk drawer hardware!

The jewelry class with Thomas Mann taught me more than how to saw and rivet metal. It also gave me a new perspective on how I work as an artist.

When I make art quilts I’m not mindful of how I create. I just make the stuff. Free cut at piece of fabric, fuse it into place. But when working in a different material like metal, suddenly I am very aware of how I go about designing and making the art.

This is what I learned from taking this jewelry class:

  • It’s hard to work in a classroom situation. With so many people bustling around it’s difficult to concentrate. You can either ignore everyone else or engage fellow students and learn from them.
  • Have the right tools for the job. Without the right tools for the materials you are working with, you can’t even begin to make the art work. Without saws, hammers, drills, and the handy anvil, you can’t work in metal.
  • One piece of art work can lead to the next and the next. Left over shapes can inspire the next creation.
  • Everyone learns a new skill differently. Some students need written directions, or visual directions, or verbal directions or are tactile learners. 

It became obvious to me that I am a tactile learner and need to work with the materials directly. The fancy name for this is a “kinesthetic”. The not so fancy name is a “do-er”. Are you a do-er or one of those other people?