Hanging Out with Some Friends in Paducah

Sprouts on exhibit at the National Quilt Museum

Would you like to see an inspiring quilt show this summer? The famous Chicago School of Fusing compatriots exhibit begins July 15 at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah KY and extends through October 4.

Sprouts (detail)

We are fond friends who frequently find fusing fun.

Listen to this fantastic line up of artists:

Sprouts #2 (detail)

With something for everyone you are sure to enjoy the show (and the Museum Gift Shop ain’t bad either). If you can, make an appointment to stop in at Caryl Breyer Fallert’s studio or take a class at the museum.
Better yet. Call me and we’ll all go together!

Hanging Out with Some Friends in Paducah

Sprouts on exhibit at the National Quilt Museum

Would you like to see an inspiring quilt show this summer? The famous Chicago School of Fusing compatriots exhibit begins July 15 at the National Quilt Museum in Paducah KY and extends through October 4.

Sprouts (detail)

We are fond friends who frequently find fusing fun.

Listen to this fantastic line up of artists:

Sprouts #2 (detail)

With something for everyone you are sure to enjoy the show (and the Museum Gift Shop ain’t bad either). If you can, make an appointment to stop in at Caryl Breyer Fallert’s studio or take a class at the museum.
Better yet. Call me and we’ll all go together!

Have You Seen the View from Above?

There is nothing like a low flight over rolling farm land. It gives you an appreciation for the vastness of the earth and whole new perspective on the color green.

 From the dusty green of a field of oats to the deep green of oak trees on a fence line, the land is a sea of lush color. And have you ever seen such wonderful patterns carved into farm fields? Maybe they are quilters at heart!

Sprouts, Green Grass, Evening Greens, Moss Artfabrik colorways

As a dyer, seeing so many variations of green is entrancing. Can I translate what I see from the air into dyed fabric?  No. Not even close. Mother nature wins again!

Have You Seen the View from Above?

There is nothing like a low flight over rolling farm land. It gives you an appreciation for the vastness of the earth and whole new perspective on the color green.

 From the dusty green of a field of oats to the deep green of oak trees on a fence line, the land is a sea of lush color. And have you ever seen such wonderful patterns carved into farm fields? Maybe they are quilters at heart!

Sprouts, Green Grass, Evening Greens, Moss Artfabrik colorways

As a dyer, seeing so many variations of green is entrancing. Can I translate what I see from the air into dyed fabric?  No. Not even close. Mother nature wins again!

How to Tuesday: How to Get a Grip on Your Art

T-Bird (before stitching)

When you make a composition  with your gorgeous fused fabrics keep this in mind: you need a variety of sizes of elements in your composition. Variety of size holds the viewers attention and keeps them looking at your masterpiece or in this case, a new quilt in process called T-Bird.

You can easily manipulate large fabric elements in your design. But those itty bitty pieces will drive you nuts. (Oh, so that explains it!)

Why not use a pair of tweezers to place little fabric pieces? These tweezers with the L shaped tip are perfect. Here the small fabric pieces are arranged as a flower unit on silicone release paper and fuse-tacked into place.

After the fabric cools, slide the tweezers under the flower unit and gently remove it from the paper. Now you can easily place it on the quilt top.

Tweezers are also a really handy tool for rearranging elements into different positions on the quilt top.  Here you see I am about to audition the placement of my bird.

Tweezers: they’re not for plucking anymore!

How to Tuesday: How to Get a Grip on Your Art

T-Bird (before stitching)

When you make a composition  with your gorgeous fused fabrics keep this in mind: you need a variety of sizes of elements in your composition. Variety of size holds the viewers attention and keeps them looking at your masterpiece or in this case, a new quilt in process called T-Bird.

You can easily manipulate large fabric elements in your design. But those itty bitty pieces will drive you nuts. (Oh, so that explains it!)

Why not use a pair of tweezers to place little fabric pieces? These tweezers with the L shaped tip are perfect. Here the small fabric pieces are arranged as a flower unit on silicone release paper and fuse-tacked into place.

After the fabric cools, slide the tweezers under the flower unit and gently remove it from the paper. Now you can easily place it on the quilt top.

Tweezers are also a really handy tool for rearranging elements into different positions on the quilt top.  Here you see I am about to audition the placement of my bird.

Tweezers: they’re not for plucking anymore!