Thread-u-cation Thursdays: Daisy Packs a Pistil

In the thrill of the moment, I’ve decided to give Lazy Daisy a pistil! Armed with a Pistil Stitch, the Lazy Daisy Stitch acquires a whole new look that resembles something…… I just can’t put my finger on it. Here they are, all lined up with no place to go.

Here’s how to make the Lazy Daisy / Pistil Stitch: Begin as you would a Lazy Daisy by exiting the fabric at point A. Now insert the needle right next to A and take a short stitch (about 1/4″) and exit the fabric at B. Trap the thread under the needle and draw the needle and thread through the fabric to create a loop.

The next step is to make a  Pistil Stitch by grasping the thread in your left hand and holding it parallel to the fabric. Wind the thread clockwise around the horizontal needle 3 times. Insert the needle tip about 1/4″ to the left of Point B at Point C. Now slowly draw the needle and thread through the knot to the back of the quilt.

Now I remember what this stitch combo reminds me of: bowling pins!

If you know the real name of this stitch, please let me know. If not, send someone who can carry boxes of heavy books. (See yesterday’s post for clarification.)

Thread-u-cation Thursdays: Daisy Packs a Pistil

In the thrill of the moment, I’ve decided to give Lazy Daisy a pistil! Armed with a Pistil Stitch, the Lazy Daisy Stitch acquires a whole new look that resembles something…… I just can’t put my finger on it. Here they are, all lined up with no place to go.

Here’s how to make the Lazy Daisy / Pistil Stitch: Begin as you would a Lazy Daisy by exiting the fabric at point A. Now insert the needle right next to A and take a short stitch (about 1/4″) and exit the fabric at B. Trap the thread under the needle and draw the needle and thread through the fabric to create a loop.

The next step is to make a  Pistil Stitch by grasping the thread in your left hand and holding it parallel to the fabric. Wind the thread clockwise around the horizontal needle 3 times. Insert the needle tip about 1/4″ to the left of Point B at Point C. Now slowly draw the needle and thread through the knot to the back of the quilt.

Now I remember what this stitch combo reminds me of: bowling pins!

If you know the real name of this stitch, please let me know. If not, send someone who can carry boxes of heavy books. (See yesterday’s post for clarification.)

Can This Studio Be Saved?


Three years ago my new studio furniture and lighting were installed. Mike from Tracey’s Tables delivered 2 new sewing tables, 2 large quilt storage cabinets, and a raised table for fusing/creating. Isn’t it pretty?

And then disaster struck!

A few days ago my beloved dryer passed away. (Sob!)  I had to clear the stairwell to get the old dryer upstairs and the new dryer down stairs. Everything on the stairwell ended up in my sewing studio including 3 bookcases full of books!

I hope my new dryer appreciates all the effort we went to getting it into place.

Can This Studio Be Saved?


Three years ago my new studio furniture and lighting were installed. Mike from Tracey’s Tables delivered 2 new sewing tables, 2 large quilt storage cabinets, and a raised table for fusing/creating. Isn’t it pretty?

And then disaster struck!

A few days ago my beloved dryer passed away. (Sob!)  I had to clear the stairwell to get the old dryer upstairs and the new dryer down stairs. Everything on the stairwell ended up in my sewing studio including 3 bookcases full of books!

I hope my new dryer appreciates all the effort we went to getting it into place.

How to Tuesday: When Murdering Your Glue is a Good Thing

We all know this when fusing: too much heat from the iron for too long will kill fusible web on fabric. Repeated exposure to a hot iron actually burns the glue into the fabric. The fabric shapes get stiff and soon pop off the fabric like a rubber band in flight.

Don’t do it!

But, as Dean of Corrections at the Chicago School of Fusing, I do give you permission to kill glue on your ironing board. The glue loves the iron and wants to melt all over it. If you get fusible web on your ironing surface, the iron will melt it and put it on your beautiful quilt top.

Here’s how to kill your glue: Place Release Paper on the offending splotch of glue. Now iron the glue through the paper a good 20 – 30 seconds. This will melt the glue into the ironing board fabric and it will no longer be attracted to your hot iron.

For the iron it’s like getting out of a bad romance that’s a little sticky. And if it takes murdering the glue to do it, so be it. (You may have noticed. I have a little mean streak in me.)

How to Tuesday: When Murdering Your Glue is a Good Thing

We all know this when fusing: too much heat from the iron for too long will kill fusible web on fabric. Repeated exposure to a hot iron actually burns the glue into the fabric. The fabric shapes get stiff and soon pop off the fabric like a rubber band in flight.

Don’t do it!

But, as Dean of Corrections at the Chicago School of Fusing, I do give you permission to kill glue on your ironing board. The glue loves the iron and wants to melt all over it. If you get fusible web on your ironing surface, the iron will melt it and put it on your beautiful quilt top.

Here’s how to kill your glue: Place Release Paper on the offending splotch of glue. Now iron the glue through the paper a good 20 – 30 seconds. This will melt the glue into the ironing board fabric and it will no longer be attracted to your hot iron.

For the iron it’s like getting out of a bad romance that’s a little sticky. And if it takes murdering the glue to do it, so be it. (You may have noticed. I have a little mean streak in me.)