Thread-u-cation Thursday: Colonial Knot

Put on your powdered wig and grab your knickerbockers! We are about to learn the Colonial Knot! (OK, the knickerbocker reference may not be historically correct but grab something!) I like stitching Colonial Knots because they are faster to make than French Knots and you can easily toss them in as a background filler with the Scattered Seed stitch (see above). Also, it gives me an excuse to wear knickerbockers.

Here’s how I make my Colonial Knots: With the thread on the top of the quilt at A, form a backwards letter C with the thread. Then place the needle to the right of point A. Slip the needle under the thread so it is going across the tip of the needle and under the shaft of the needle.

Now shift the needle in front of point A and wrap the thread across the needle and slip it under the tip of the needle. It should look like a figure 8 around the needle.

Scoot the needle tip across the fabric to insert it back into the fabric close to point A. Draw the needle and thread through the fabric and invite the neighbors over for Thanksgiving. Congratulations! You are now an official Colonial Knot Maker! You may now remover your knickerbockers.

Thread-u-cation Thursday: Colonial Knot

Put on your powdered wig and grab your knickerbockers! We are about to learn the Colonial Knot! (OK, the knickerbocker reference may not be historically correct but grab something!) I like stitching Colonial Knots because they are faster to make than French Knots and you can easily toss them in as a background filler with the Scattered Seed stitch (see above). Also, it gives me an excuse to wear knickerbockers.

Here’s how I make my Colonial Knots: With the thread on the top of the quilt at A, form a backwards letter C with the thread. Then place the needle to the right of point A. Slip the needle under the thread so it is going across the tip of the needle and under the shaft of the needle.

Now shift the needle in front of point A and wrap the thread across the needle and slip it under the tip of the needle. It should look like a figure 8 around the needle.

Scoot the needle tip across the fabric to insert it back into the fabric close to point A. Draw the needle and thread through the fabric and invite the neighbors over for Thanksgiving. Congratulations! You are now an official Colonial Knot Maker! You may now remover your knickerbockers.

Name that Bird Class Contest

Here’s a contest you are sure to want to enter so you can win valuable prizes. What should I call my new class where we make birds doing bird like things in a colorful way?  If you can name that #*!@ class, I’ll send you a set of 4 bird patterns! There are 2 rules. The class can not be named “Bird is the Word” or “Fusing Fowl”. And the birds in the title can not be doing anything disgusting. Following is the class description.

Like a bird in flight, this class will lift your spirits and make you sing! You’ll create fun little birds dancing, nesting, and wading knee deep in personality. Our colorful fowl (indigenous only to the campus of the Chicago School of Fusing) are created with fused fabrics and hand embroidery. Your kit includes all the hand dyed fabrics and threads you’ll need for your little bird quilt top.

Name that Bird Class Contest

Here’s a contest you are sure to want to enter so you can win valuable prizes. What should I call my new class where we make birds doing bird like things in a colorful way?  If you can name that #*!@ class, I’ll send you a set of 4 bird patterns! There are 2 rules. The class can not be named “Bird is the Word” or “Fusing Fowl”. And the birds in the title can not be doing anything disgusting. Following is the class description.

Like a bird in flight, this class will lift your spirits and make you sing! You’ll create fun little birds dancing, nesting, and wading knee deep in personality. Our colorful fowl (indigenous only to the campus of the Chicago School of Fusing) are created with fused fabrics and hand embroidery. Your kit includes all the hand dyed fabrics and threads you’ll need for your little bird quilt top.

Iron Maidens!

Meet the latest graduating class from the Chicago School of Fusing. These lovely ladies joined me in Paducah, KY for 3 days of creativity and fun in my Fusing Fun Class. I had a great time!

Our first lesson? When transferring fusible web to fabric make sure to iron the paper “to the edge and beyond!” Here we are practicing going to the edge and beyond. It’s a move used by Tai Chi fusers world wide.

Our lovely hostess for the class is a new member of the National Quilt Museum staff, Becky, who also improvised a fused art quilt while providing us with energy boosting brownies and coffee.

Class member, Teresa, shows off her colorful creations.

 Sheila poses with her beautiful flower quilt that she is adding hand embroidery to.

We helped Debra celebrate her birthday weekend and she made a fun party quilt to commemorate the occasion. Happy Birthday Debra!

Elizabeth made these sweet dream home quilts and added a delightful striped binding to her flower quilt.

Michele created beautifully cut shapes for her garden and sewing tools quilts.

Anne invented new planetary systems and a landscape full of texture and beauty.

Judith’s whimsical landscape reflects her sense of fun and good humor.

We all loved Margaret’s cheerful quilts and knowledge of all things Paducah.

And here is Beverly who was inspired by the annual Barbeque by the River contest taking place right outside our back door. She made this Pigs in Disguise quilt on the left designed with the help of a pig shaped cookie. You never know where you’ll get your inspiration!
Thanks to my students and the staff of the National Quilt Museum!

Iron Maidens!

Meet the latest graduating class from the Chicago School of Fusing. These lovely ladies joined me in Paducah, KY for 3 days of creativity and fun in my Fusing Fun Class. I had a great time!

Our first lesson? When transferring fusible web to fabric make sure to iron the paper “to the edge and beyond!” Here we are practicing going to the edge and beyond. It’s a move used by Tai Chi fusers world wide.

Our lovely hostess for the class is a new member of the National Quilt Museum staff, Becky, who also improvised a fused art quilt while providing us with energy boosting brownies and coffee.

Class member, Teresa, shows off her colorful creations.

 Sheila poses with her beautiful flower quilt that she is adding hand embroidery to.

We helped Debra celebrate her birthday weekend and she made a fun party quilt to commemorate the occasion. Happy Birthday Debra!

Elizabeth made these sweet dream home quilts and added a delightful striped binding to her flower quilt.

Michele created beautifully cut shapes for her garden and sewing tools quilts.

Anne invented new planetary systems and a landscape full of texture and beauty.

Judith’s whimsical landscape reflects her sense of fun and good humor.

We all loved Margaret’s cheerful quilts and knowledge of all things Paducah.

And here is Beverly who was inspired by the annual Barbeque by the River contest taking place right outside our back door. She made this Pigs in Disguise quilt on the left designed with the help of a pig shaped cookie. You never know where you’ll get your inspiration!
Thanks to my students and the staff of the National Quilt Museum!