Quilting in Colorado
Attending the Denver National Quilt Festival brings you within site of the glorious Rocky Mountains. And although I love the mountains where I was born, the walls of the Denver Merchant Center hold some beautiful sites too. The quality of the quilts on exhibit in this show is really pleasant to behold. And the welcome from the Colorado quilters is warm and friendly.

You can find me teaching Stitch After Fusing today and a half-day version of Tiny Homes on Saturday followed by my lecture Art Quilts: The Musical. Come join me in the mile high city, mountain viewing optional.

Quilting in Colorado
Attending the Denver National Quilt Festival brings you within site of the glorious Rocky Mountains. And although I love the mountains where I was born, the walls of the Denver Merchant Center hold some beautiful sites too. The quality of the quilts on exhibit in this show is really pleasant to behold. And the welcome from the Colorado quilters is warm and friendly.

You can find me teaching Stitch After Fusing today and a half-day version of Tiny Homes on Saturday followed by my lecture Art Quilts: The Musical. Come join me in the mile high city, mountain viewing optional.

Thread-u-cation Thursday: Wheat Ear Stitch

 

Thread-u-cation Thursday- Wheat Ear Stitch
The cute Wheat Ear Stitch reminds me of little people holding their arms up. They are so happy to be part of your quilt they are madly cheering you on. You could also think of them as grains of wheat or bugs…..

The Wheat Ear Stitch can be used alone as a texture making device, like the field decorations above, or as a linked stitch to form lines or shapes. Here’s the Little Bird on the Prairie singing to a celestial sighting, maybe the sun.

Here’s how I make my Wheat Ear Stitches: Make a straight stitch about 1/4″ long from A to B. Then bring the thread up at C and insert the needle at point D (also point B) to form a V shape with the AB line. Bring the needle and thread up at point E about 1/4″ down from the BD point. Scoot the needle under the AB and CD lines.

Re-insert the needle at E and draw the thread to the back of the quilt to make a single Wheat Ear. Or re-insert the needle at E and come up at point F about 1/4″ up and to the right of E. This point now becomes point A. Repeat the directions above to form a line of Wheat Ears.
I hope you enjoy adding the Wheat Ear Stitch to your quilt tops. I’m cheering you on!

Thread-u-cation Thursday: Wheat Ear Stitch

 

Thread-u-cation Thursday- Wheat Ear Stitch
The cute Wheat Ear Stitch reminds me of little people holding their arms up. They are so happy to be part of your quilt they are madly cheering you on. You could also think of them as grains of wheat or bugs…..

The Wheat Ear Stitch can be used alone as a texture making device, like the field decorations above, or as a linked stitch to form lines or shapes. Here’s the Little Bird on the Prairie singing to a celestial sighting, maybe the sun.

Here’s how I make my Wheat Ear Stitches: Make a straight stitch about 1/4″ long from A to B. Then bring the thread up at C and insert the needle at point D (also point B) to form a V shape with the AB line. Bring the needle and thread up at point E about 1/4″ down from the BD point. Scoot the needle under the AB and CD lines.

Re-insert the needle at E and draw the thread to the back of the quilt to make a single Wheat Ear. Or re-insert the needle at E and come up at point F about 1/4″ up and to the right of E. This point now becomes point A. Repeat the directions above to form a line of Wheat Ears.
I hope you enjoy adding the Wheat Ear Stitch to your quilt tops. I’m cheering you on!

Collector’s Item
Meet Ricky Tims, a man of great taste. He is the new owner of my latest little art quilt Weezie’s Wildflowers. Thank you for adding my art work to your collection! (I’m the one in the hat.)

I’m happy the little quilt is going to a good home. The second in this series of Weezie’s Wildflowers was also sold at the Paducah show to another of my collectors. And like the first quilt above, it is also all hand embroidered (no machine work at all) and placed on a curved piece of Timetex for a support using a Wrapped Binding technique. Thank you to all my collectors!

Collector’s Item
Meet Ricky Tims, a man of great taste. He is the new owner of my latest little art quilt Weezie’s Wildflowers. Thank you for adding my art work to your collection! (I’m the one in the hat.)

I’m happy the little quilt is going to a good home. The second in this series of Weezie’s Wildflowers was also sold at the Paducah show to another of my collectors. And like the first quilt above, it is also all hand embroidered (no machine work at all) and placed on a curved piece of Timetex for a support using a Wrapped Binding technique. Thank you to all my collectors!